7 Ways to Beat Fatigue

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Winter weather got you down? If you’re fighting the urge to hibernate, you’re not alone. Banish fatigue and get back in the game with these helpful tips.

Eat Right for Energy

When you’re in a slump it can be tempting to reach for high-sugar, high-carb fixes. What your body really needs is healthy foods like fruit, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat, beans, and seeds. Start the day off right with a low-sugar, low fat breakfast, and be sure to eat regularly throughout the day to avoid energy peaks and troughs. Consider a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement if your diet is low in key nutrients.

Snack Smart to Fuel Your Metabolism

Experts recommend eating every three to four hours to fuel a healthy metabolism, so snacks have an important role to play in keeping energy levels stable throughout the day. The best choices combine protein and fiber-rich carbohydrates. Try these tasty combos:

  • Berries and yogurt
  • Carrots and cheese
  • Nuts and an apple

Beat Fatigue with Healthy Hydration

Dehydration is a common cause of fatigue. The best time to hydrate is before and during a workout, rather than after. A good rule of thumb: If you feel thirsty, you’re already dehydrated.

Rest & Recuperate

Making up your sleep deficit may help you get your energy back. Sleep debt can be repaid like a credit card balance—a little at a time. Sneaking in an extra 15 minutes a night will have you sleep-debt free in no time, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

Increase Energy by Stressing Less

Stress can worsen fatigue. To boost your energy, find ways to relax. Walking, yoga, or even taking several deep breaths can help.

Helpful Herbs to Fight Fatigue

Stock up on adaptogenic herbs including ashwagandha and ginseng. These herbs help regulate mood and reduce feelings of stress and anxiety.

Boost Energy Levels with the Magic of Mushrooms 

Medicinal mushrooms offer a host of energy-boosting benefits. Try reishi to stay alert and energized.

Work Out So You Are Not Tired Out 

It may seem counterintuitive to exercise when you’re tired, but it’s a great way to boost energy. One study found that healthy, but sedentary, people can reduce their feelings of tiredness by 65 percent just by engaging in regular, low-intensity exercise. A 20-minute walk three times a week is a good start.

Sources: 

“9 ways to get your energy back” by Peter Jaret, www.WebMD.com, 4/1/14 

Body into Balance: An Herbal Guide to Holistic Self-Care by Maria Noël Groves ($24.95, Storey, 2016)

“Factors associated with pre-event hydration status and drinking behavior of middle-aged cyclists” by B.A. Yates et al., J Nutr Health Aging, 2018 

“Fluid balance in team sport athletes and the effect of hypohydration on cognitive, technical, and physical performance” by R.P. Nuccio et al., Sports Med, 10/17 

 “Sleep debt: Tips for catching up on sleep,” National Sleep Foundation, www.Sleep.org

“Eating to boost energy” by Tara Gidus, www.EatRight.org, 7/13/17