Cleanse With Clay

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Facial masks serve many purposes; they can hydrate, moisturize, heal, and promote relaxation. Among many of the world’s cultures, the use of clay for skin care is a consistent beauty strategy. 

Don’t Forget About Plants 

Look for plant stem cell extracts in mask and scrubs. After exfoliating to remove dead skin cells, applying products containing plant stem cell extracts may encourage the growth of new, healthy skin cells.

Skin experts have noted for years that mineral-rich clays can lighten dark spots on skin, reduce oil and dirt, and minimize follicle infections. 

Two clay types worth noting are French green clay and Moroccan red clay. 

Go Green

Traditionally, the French have embraced green clay’s healing powers in spas and baths. In addition to its basic benefits, French green clay has been shown in scientific research to cure necrotic skin infections and other viral skin conditions. Because of its potent antibacterial qualities, this clay has been used for medicinal purposes on the Ivory Coast of Africa.

From the Volcanos

Moroccan red clay is derived from the volcanic material of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Also known as Rhassoul clay, this soothing material effectively reduces blackheads, creates an even tone for acne-prone skin, and reduces flakiness for those with dry skin. It also benefits hair and skin follicle health. 

Find the Right Product

Some products combine Moroccan red clay or French green clay with other effective natural ingredients.

While you can find Moroccan red clay in a Pore Minimizing Mask from ACURE, the similar scrub adds jojoba beads. As the clay boosts the complexion, the beads provide added exfoliation. A scrub, done weekly, removes dead skin cells and prevents breakouts. 

French green clay is also a featured ingredient in ACURE’s new Cell Stimulating Face Mask and its award-winning Brightening Facial Scrub, which helps cleanse the skin of impurities while protecting its natural moisture.

Sources: 

“Chemical and Mineralogical Characteristics of French Green Clays Used For Healing,” by L.B. Williams et al., Clays Clay Miner, 7/08 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600539/

“How to Use Rhassoul Clay For Beauty and Detox,” WellnessMama.com, 2015 http://wellnessmama.com/60252/how-to-use-rhassoul-clay/

“Moroccan Red Clay - Blackheads Be Gone!” HolisticHerbalist.com, 10/12 http://www.holistichealthherbalist.com/moroccan-red-clay-blackheads-gone/

Contributor: 

Pamela Bump

Pamela is a recipient of Boston University’s Master of Science in Media Ventures. In addition to developing online content and managing social media for Taste for Life, she’s served as Health Editor/Copy Editor for the Keene Sentinel newspaper, Social Media/Member Engagement Coordinator for Boston Women in Media & Entertainment, and Editorial Assistant for MedTechBoston.com.